Teneshia T. Samuel: NEO-KENTE

This virtual exhibition of a series of images and designer silks, titled “NEO-KENTE” represents the next generation of contemporary cloth-making, integrating digital design and ancient and modern symbols of intersectional Black identities.

Type of Exhibition: Art

People of African descent hold a long history of embedding rich storytelling into works of textile and fiber art. Textile and fiber art in the Black community is created for the purposes of adornment, teaching, ceremony, the telling of personal narratives, the denoting of status and kinship, and the manifestation of new realities and futures. Kente cloth, mud cloth, wax prints, Ankara fabrics, Adire and Adinkra cloth are just a few of the wealth of textile and fiber arts known to be associated with people of African descent; and they have become symbols of pride, identity, and social affiliation. This virtual exhibit of a series of images and designer silks, titled “NEO-KENTE” represents the next generation of contemporary cloth-making, integrating digital design and ancient and modern symbols of intersectional Black identities. These new digital fabrics represent the diversity of people of African descent in millennial diaspora.

 

ARTIST BIOGRAPHY

Teneshia T. Samuel is a first-generation Caribbean Canadian multi-disciplinary artist, social activist, politician and scholar. Born with 10% vision and 50% hearing, the subject of Teneshia’s work discusses intersectional identities, life in diaspora and paths to liberation for self and community. Exploring the subjects of Queer identity, disability, madness and Blackness, Teneshia creates work that crosses multiple media from visual art, literature and fashion design.

 

Join artist Teneshia T. Samuel for a special event:

African Cloth-Making: Storytelling, Connection and Kinship

People of African descent hold a long history of embedding rich storytelling into works of textile and fiber art. Textile and Fiber Art in the Black community are created for the purposes of adornment, teaching, ceremony, the telling of personal narratives, the denoting of status and kinship and the manifestation of new realities and futures. Kente cloth, mud cloth, wax prints, Ankara fabrics, Adire and Adinkra cloth are just a few of the wealth of textile and fiber arts known to be associated with people of African descent. This lecture will provide an introduction to the meaning of cloth-making in African cultures.

Wednesday, February 16, 2022
7:00 PM to 8:30 PM, FREE
Held on zoom

Register here to receive the zoom link for the event.

Presented by:

A Kultura Collective Member

In partnership with

Wagner Green Centre for Access & Inclusion and in honour of Black History Month

Start Date:

February 1, 2022

End Date:

February 28, 2022

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Virtual

Virtual Gallery

Accessibility

If accessibility options not listed, please contact the venue to confirm

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